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Reflections:
Pope talks airstrikes

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placeholder September 8, 2014   •   VOL. 52, NO. 15   •   Oakland, CA
Letters from Readers

Pope Francis answers questions from journalists aboard the papal flight from Seoul, South Korea, to Rome Aug. 18.
Paul Haring/cns

Reflections
Pope talks airstrikes

ABOARD THE PAPAL FLIGHT FROM SEOUL, South Korea — Pope Francis said the use of force can be justified to stop "unjust aggressors" such as Islamic State militants in northeastern Iraq, but he declined to endorse U.S. military airstrikes against the militants and said such humanitarian interventions should not be decided on by any single country.

The pope also said he was willing to travel to the war zone if necessary to stop the violence.

Pope Francis made his remarks Aug. 18 during an hourlong inflight news conference on his way back from South Korea.

The pope's words on Iraq came a week after his representative in Baghdad welcomed President Barack Obama's decision to use military force against Islamic State positions.

Asked about the airstrikes Aug. 11, Archbishop Giorgio Lingua, the Vatican nuncio to Iraq, told Vatican Radio: "This is something that had to be done, otherwise (the Islamic State) could not be stopped."

That statement surprised many because, since the pontificate of St. John Paul II, the Vatican has stressed that military interventions for humanitarian purposes should have the support of the international community.

When a reporter on the plane asked Pope Francis whether he approved of the airstrikes, he replied:

"In these cases where there is unjust aggression, I can only say that it is licit to stop the unjust aggressor. I underscore the verb 'stop;' I don't say bomb, make war — stop him. The means by which he may be stopped should be evaluated. To stop the unjust aggressor is licit, but we nevertheless need to remember how many times, using this excuse of stopping an unjust aggressor, the powerful nations have dominated other peoples, made a real war of conquest. A single nation cannot judge how to stop this, how to stop an unjust aggressor. After the Second World War, there arose the idea of the United Nations. That is where we should discuss: 'Is there an unjust aggressor? It seems there is. How do we stop him?' But only that, nothing more."

The pope said his recent appeal to the U.N. to "take action to end the humanitarian tragedy now underway in Iraq" was one of a series of measures he had considered with Vatican officials, including his decision to send Cardinal Fernando Filoni to the region to meet with church and government officials and refugees.

Catholic News Service


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